Quotes & Links #77

1) enlightenmenteconomics.com: Not all economists are neoliberal, honest

My relationship with the concept of neoliberalism is an uneasy one, in that I don’t really know what it means. Often, radical writers use it to mean ‘most of economics’ […]

Noah Smith on a similar topic: “So most economists are supporters of a mixed economy.
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Quotes & Links #70

1) theguardian.com: Georg Baselitz: why art’s great shock merchant has set his sights on opera
I don’t necessarily agree with his view that women can’t paint, but I do wonder where are women the most successful? Literature? Music? Hmm.

2) qz.com: The world’s best airport has a horticulture team, a butterfly garden, and 500,000 plants

The airport features a butterfly garden, an orchid garden with a koi pond, and an “enchanted garden” that combines flowers and soft ferns with sculptures and sparkling lights.

Not surprised to see Seoul being nr. 2. I doubt something like that would be build in Germany, and, while it’s beautiful, it’s also not really necessary and maybe even a waste of money.

3) afinetheorem.wordpress.com: The Economics of John Nash
Probably the best post on Nash’s academic contributions I’ve read so far.
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Quotes & Links #59

1) voxeu.org: Economic consequences of gender identity

The results indicate that the prescription that women should earn less than men plays a role in marriage rates, the labour market supply of women, and marital satisfaction.

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Older Reading Pile

1) Liar’s Poker by Michael Lewis (1989)

From Wikipedia: “~ is a non-fiction, semi-autobiographical book by Michael Lewis describing the author’s experiences as a bond salesman on Wall Street during the late 1980s. […] The book captures an important period in the history of Wall Street. Two important figures in that history feature prominently in the text, the head of Salomon Brothers’ mortgage department Lewis Ranieri and the firm’s CEO John Gutfreund.”

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