Quotes & Links #80

1) breakingsmart.com: A New Soft Technology

Software eating the world is a story of the seen and the unseen: small, measurable effects that seem underwhelming or even negative, and large invisible and positive effects that are easy to miss, unless you know where to look.

This has happened before of course: money and written language both transformed the world in similarly profound ways. Software, however, is more flexible and powerful than either.

Am looking forward to more.
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Quotes & Links #78

1) washingtonpost.com/wonkblog: One big myth about medicine: We know how drugs work

Knowing why a drug works has historically trailed the treatment, sometimes by decades. Some of the most recognizable drugs — acetaminophen for pain relief, penicillin for infections, and lithium for bipolar disorder, continue to be scientific mysteries today.

SOFT SCIENCE!
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Quotes & Links #77

1) enlightenmenteconomics.com: Not all economists are neoliberal, honest

My relationship with the concept of neoliberalism is an uneasy one, in that I don’t really know what it means. Often, radical writers use it to mean ‘most of economics’ […]

Noah Smith on a similar topic: “So most economists are supporters of a mixed economy.
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Quotes & Links #69

1) aeon.co: Against Generations

But in real life, I find generational arguments infuriating. Overly schematised and ridiculously reductive, generation theory is a simplistic way of thinking about the relationship between individuals, society, and history. It encourages us to focus on vague ‘generational personalities’, rather than looking at the confusing diversity of social life.

I think there are differences between people who grow in different times, however, they are not clear cut and the intragenerational differences are very pronounced, too. Still, as long as you don’t overgeneralize and overemphasize generational differences there’s no problem.

2) vox.com: No more dieting, and 7 other things we do differently after reporting on health care

Medical errors kill more people than car crashes or new disease outbreaks. They kill more people annually than breast cancer, AIDS, plane crashes, or drug overdoses.

This, I did not know.
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